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World history homework help

  Discuss weapons proliferation around the world. U.S., Iran, North Korea, China

 
Discuss weapons proliferation around the world. U.S., Iran, North Korea, China, Russia, etc. What are the threats and issues of weapons proliferation as we move into the future? What country is the biggest threat? What are the challenges in limiting the weapons caches of governments? What is the biggest fear from non-state actors (terrorist groups, criminal elements, etc.) in the proliferation of nuclear weapons? 
Provide examples to support your argument/point of view.

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World history homework help

  Discuss weapons proliferation around the world. U.S., Iran, North Korea, China

 
Discuss weapons proliferation around the world. U.S., Iran, North Korea, China, Russia, etc. What are the threats and issues of weapons proliferation as we move into the future? What country is the biggest threat? What are the challenges in limiting the weapons caches of governments? What is the biggest fear from non-state actors (terrorist groups, criminal elements, etc.) in the proliferation of nuclear weapons? 
Provide examples to support your argument/point of view.

Categories
World history homework help

 What were the social, cultural, religious, and economic characteristics of Egyp

 What were the social, cultural, religious, and economic characteristics of Egyptian Civilization?  What was Ancient Egypt’s greatest single contribution to world culture? Why? 

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World history homework help

 What were the social, cultural, religious, and economic characteristics of Egyp

 What were the social, cultural, religious, and economic characteristics of Egyptian Civilization?  What was Ancient Egypt’s greatest single contribution to world culture? Why? 

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World history homework help

 What were the social, cultural, religious, and economic characteristics of Indi

 What were the social, cultural, religious, and economic characteristics of Indian Civilization?  What was Ancient India’s greatest single contribution to world culture? Why? 

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World history homework help

1. In regards to the values espoused in the religions of Daoism/Confucianism, wh

1. In regards to the values espoused in the religions of Daoism/Confucianism, why would a person go up into the mountains to find balance, and harmony?
2. What are the ramifications for this sort of philosophy in the world today?
3. What might the west learn from the key concepts in Confucian thought, especially around the notion of Ren and Li?
4. Why did communist China, for a time, impeach the teachings of Confucius? 

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World history homework help

1. In regards to the values espoused in the religions of Daoism/Confucianism, wh

1. In regards to the values espoused in the religions of Daoism/Confucianism, why would a person go up into the mountains to find balance, and harmony?
2. What are the ramifications for this sort of philosophy in the world today?
3. What might the west learn from the key concepts in Confucian thought, especially around the notion of Ren and Li?
4. Why did communist China, for a time, impeach the teachings of Confucius? 

Categories
World history homework help

 Stalin NOT Responsible for Cold War   The Cold War is a period of history that

 Stalin NOT Responsible for Cold War
 
The Cold War is a period of history that is widely known and studied due to its significant impact on the world. It had roots starting in the early 1940s to the early 1990s and left an indelible mark on international relations. The primary cause of the beginning of the Cold War has been debated over by many historians, some of whom argue that former Soviet leader Joseph Stalin was to blame. This esay seeks to refute this argument by providing evidence that Stalin was not the primary cause of the Cold War.
As argued by Sherwin in his excerpt, “The Atomic Bomb and the Origins of the Cold War” from Melvyn Leffler and David Painter’s Origins of the Cold War, Joseph Stalin was not the catalyst for the Cold War. Rather, it was America’s decision to deploy atomic bombs against Hiroshima and Nagasaki and the United States’ failure to notify the Soviet Union, its ally in the war against Nazi Germany, which then brought the three-year alliance between the two powers to an end. This dual deployment, more than any other event, began the Cold War in 1945. 
American policymakers’ decisions to drop the atomic bombs, which were far more powerful than any conventional bomb, showed their willingness to use military force to achieve their objectives and thus created an atmosphere of fear and mistrust between the United States and the Soviet Union that made a new Cold War inevitable. By dropping the atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the United States began to turn its focus from the war against Nazi Germany to the new conflict of the Cold War. 
The Soviets’ resentment of the United States’ refusal to share knowledge of the atomic weapons and the U.S.’s refusal to recognize the new communist led governments of Eastern Europe, which had been liberated from Nazi control, further lead to the rift between the two countries during the early 1947. The US government’s refusal to recognize the governments of eastern European states, caused so much acrimony between the two countries that the Cold War became inevitable.
The emergence of the Cold War after the end of the Second World War was largely due to the ideologies and power politics that developed between the United States and the Soviet Union. Despite Joseph Stalin’s uncompromising attitude, it was the atomic bombs, refusal to share knowledge of the atomic weapons, and the United States’ refusal to recognize newly formed communist states of Eastern Europe that acted as triggers of the Cold War. Thus, while Joseph Stalin’s attitude and actions certainly provoked the United States and was an essential factor in the tension between these two blocs, it was ultimately the nuclear weapons and the power politics of the two sides that were the primary drivers of the Cold War.
Resources:
1. Leffler, M.P., & Painter, D.S. (1999). Origins of the Cold War. University of North Carolina Press.
2. Sherwin, M.J. (1999). The atomic bomb and the origins of the Cold War. In M.P. Leffler & D.S. Painter (Eds.), Origins of the Cold War (pp. 201-216). University of North Carolina Press.

Categories
World history homework help

 Stalin NOT Responsible for Cold War   The Cold War is a period of history that

 Stalin NOT Responsible for Cold War
 
The Cold War is a period of history that is widely known and studied due to its significant impact on the world. It had roots starting in the early 1940s to the early 1990s and left an indelible mark on international relations. The primary cause of the beginning of the Cold War has been debated over by many historians, some of whom argue that former Soviet leader Joseph Stalin was to blame. This esay seeks to refute this argument by providing evidence that Stalin was not the primary cause of the Cold War.
As argued by Sherwin in his excerpt, “The Atomic Bomb and the Origins of the Cold War” from Melvyn Leffler and David Painter’s Origins of the Cold War, Joseph Stalin was not the catalyst for the Cold War. Rather, it was America’s decision to deploy atomic bombs against Hiroshima and Nagasaki and the United States’ failure to notify the Soviet Union, its ally in the war against Nazi Germany, which then brought the three-year alliance between the two powers to an end. This dual deployment, more than any other event, began the Cold War in 1945. 
American policymakers’ decisions to drop the atomic bombs, which were far more powerful than any conventional bomb, showed their willingness to use military force to achieve their objectives and thus created an atmosphere of fear and mistrust between the United States and the Soviet Union that made a new Cold War inevitable. By dropping the atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the United States began to turn its focus from the war against Nazi Germany to the new conflict of the Cold War. 
The Soviets’ resentment of the United States’ refusal to share knowledge of the atomic weapons and the U.S.’s refusal to recognize the new communist led governments of Eastern Europe, which had been liberated from Nazi control, further lead to the rift between the two countries during the early 1947. The US government’s refusal to recognize the governments of eastern European states, caused so much acrimony between the two countries that the Cold War became inevitable.
The emergence of the Cold War after the end of the Second World War was largely due to the ideologies and power politics that developed between the United States and the Soviet Union. Despite Joseph Stalin’s uncompromising attitude, it was the atomic bombs, refusal to share knowledge of the atomic weapons, and the United States’ refusal to recognize newly formed communist states of Eastern Europe that acted as triggers of the Cold War. Thus, while Joseph Stalin’s attitude and actions certainly provoked the United States and was an essential factor in the tension between these two blocs, it was ultimately the nuclear weapons and the power politics of the two sides that were the primary drivers of the Cold War.
Resources:
1. Leffler, M.P., & Painter, D.S. (1999). Origins of the Cold War. University of North Carolina Press.
2. Sherwin, M.J. (1999). The atomic bomb and the origins of the Cold War. In M.P. Leffler & D.S. Painter (Eds.), Origins of the Cold War (pp. 201-216). University of North Carolina Press.

Categories
World history homework help

 Yes, Stalin was responsible for the Cold War   Hello Class, Conflicts that aris

 Yes, Stalin was responsible for the Cold War
 
Hello Class,
Conflicts that arise after WW2 lead to the Cold War, since Stalin had a different vision of how to organize the postwar world. Both the United States and the Soviet Union came out victorious from WW2. Stalin was responsible for the Cold War because after he saw the U.S. drop the atomic bomb on Japan, he knew he needed to do something since there were many soldiers lost in WW2. Stalin got a nuclear bomb and because of that the Cold War happened. Stalin, following Machiavelli, felt that it was better to be feared than loved, when faced with force from the United States, Stalin applied counterforce because he never wanted to be viewed as weak. Stalin in his quest for prestige and perceptions of power is the main person to blame for the Cold War and how long it lasted. The Cold War was fundamentally about obtaining recognition, about projecting global leadership. Because of communism and its feared spread the U.S. played a huge part in making sure that the Soviet Union didn’t spread passed its borders. The Truman Doctrine which is the first American foreign policy pledged support for democracies against authoritarian threats because of Stalin. 
Reference:
Holloway, D. (1996, January 1). Stalin and the bomb. Political Science. Retrieved January 17, 2023, from https://politicalscience.stanford.edu/publications/stalin-and-bomb